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wired:

theatlantic:

@Horse_Ebooks Is the Most Successful Piece of Cyber Fiction, Ever

Back during the 2000s, when blogs were new, pioneers of the form argued over when blogs would be art. Pioneers of the form decided that a blog would have to be fiction, would have to be well-written, and would have to be perpetrated onto an unknowing audience. To fully engage with a fictional blog as a blog, they argued, the readers could not know it was fictive. Readers must think they are engaging with the world as is. 
Those pioneers imagined what mainstream success for blog fiction would look like. Vast audiences would get caught up in the narrative and interact with the “author.” The work would be created, or improvised, as it went along. Blog fiction, they said, could be blockbuster.
Blog fiction now exists, though it’s a small off-shoot of the blogging world. Its readers often know it’s fictive. (Though hoaxes like Gay Girl in Damascus provide a counter-example.) 
The blogging world, too, looks much different than it did back during the Bush administration. Many then-famous blogs have now petered out, ended, or gone offline. We rarely say the word “blog” anymore. Even my inability to find the arguments to which I just alluded by googling is a kind of testament to the erosion of “blogging.”
Instead of blogs, now we have vast, corporate-owned networks: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr. Fiction is there, and it can be authorial — when it looks something like @MayorEmanuel — or generative and networked — when it looks something like fan fiction or #seapunk culture. Both of these types of fiction thrive in different ways in the ecosystem, and both help us understand the network and find our place within it. We’re even used to them by now.
And today we learned that the Twitter account @horse_ebooks is probably the most successful piece of networked fiction of all time.
Read more.


Horse ebooks is our favorite Twitter feed ever. EVER!

wired:

theatlantic:

@Horse_Ebooks Is the Most Successful Piece of Cyber Fiction, Ever

Back during the 2000s, when blogs were new, pioneers of the form argued over when blogs would be artPioneers of the form decided that a blog would have to be fiction, would have to be well-written, and would have to be perpetrated onto an unknowing audience. To fully engage with a fictional blog as a blog, they argued, the readers could not know it was fictive. Readers must think they are engaging with the world as is. 

Those pioneers imagined what mainstream success for blog fiction would look like. Vast audiences would get caught up in the narrative and interact with the “author.” The work would be created, or improvised, as it went along. Blog fiction, they said, could be blockbuster.

Blog fiction now exists, though it’s a small off-shoot of the blogging world. Its readers often know it’s fictive. (Though hoaxes like Gay Girl in Damascus provide a counter-example.) 

The blogging world, too, looks much different than it did back during the Bush administration. Many then-famous blogs have now petered out, ended, or gone offline. We rarely say the word “blog” anymore. Even my inability to find the arguments to which I just alluded by googling is a kind of testament to the erosion of “blogging.”

Instead of blogs, now we have vast, corporate-owned networks: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr. Fiction is there, and it can be authorial — when it looks something like @MayorEmanuel — or generative and networked — when it looks something like fan fiction or #seapunk culture. Both of these types of fiction thrive in different ways in the ecosystem, and both help us understand the network and find our place within it. We’re even used to them by now.

And today we learned that the Twitter account @horse_ebooks is probably the most successful piece of networked fiction of all time.

Read more.

Horse ebooks is our favorite Twitter feed ever. EVER!

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